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“If only I didn’t have to speak!”

‘Confident Communicating’ regularly works with people who recognise that a lack of confidence in the areas of effective public speaking and interpersonal communication have held them back from pursuing their dreams and boldly applying for their prize jobs. This fear has stunted growth and kept them in a box. Undoubtedly self-limiting and self-defeating thoughts can trap us into a life that restricts our potential.

Another true observation is cited in Robert Dilenschneider’s book ‘Power and Influence’… “You start to communicate effectively, this leads to recognition and recognition in turn leads to influence”, I would add to that a fourth positive outcome – ‘OPPORTUNITIES’ – improved communication skills undoubtedly lead to open doors as we effectively connect with others!

If you can relate to this – NOW is the time to make a CHANGE, take a STEP and G–R-O-W. There is help at hand and there is nothing more exciting than overcoming those things that have stopped us from moving forwards.

Using your voice

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As we consider the miraculous gift that being able to speak is, we realise that, as with any other gifting, we can ignore it; take it for granted or abuse it.

Most of us probably fall into the second category with regards to using our voices until such time as we strain them through misuse and unwittingly find ourselves in the third category.  However, what about those of us who ignore the gift, and maybe due to negative experiences or self-inflicted limitations, find ourselves for the most part Silent.

Our mental health is improved as we yield to the deeply human need to speak and to be listened to. Remember Wilson, the volleyball that Tom Hanks’ character Chuck, dressed up in the film “Cast Away”. Wilson proved critical to Chuck’s mental health as his deep need to speak to someone – or anything(!) was evidenced.  Some people speak to their dog or cat or plants in the event of having no-one else to speak to.

For those of us who have become “silent”,  it is time to pick up the talking spoon again and start connecting with others verbally.